You Are My Sunshine, My Only Sunshine

Like any good mother, when Karen found out that another baby was on the way, she did what she could to help her 3-year-old son, Michael, prepare for a new sibling.

They found out that the new baby was going be a girl, and day after day, night after night, Michael sang to his sister in mommy’s tummy.

He was building a bond of love with his little sister before he even met her.

The pregnancy progressed normally for Karen, an active member of the Panther Creek United Methodist Church in Morristown,  Tennessee.

In time, the labour pains came. Soon it was every five minutes, every three, every minute. But serious complications arose during delivery and Karen found herself in hours of labour. Would a C-section be required?

Finally, after a long struggle, Michael’s little sister was born. But she was in very serious condition. With a siren howling in the night, the ambulance rushed the infant to the neonatalintensivecareunitat St. Mary’s Hospital, Knoxville,  Tennessee.

The days inched by. The little girl got worse. The pediatrician had to tell the parents there is very little hope. Be prepared for the worst. Karen and her husband contacted a local cemetery about a burial plot.

They had fixed up a special room in their house for their new baby but now they found themselves having to plan for a funeral.

Michael, however, kept begging his parents to let him see his sister. I want to sing to her, he kept saying.

Week two in intensive care looked as if a funeral would come before the week was over. Michael kept nagging about singing to his sister, but kids are never allowed in Intensive Care. Karen decided to take Michael whether they liked it or not. If he didn’t see his sister right then, he may never see her alive.

She dressed him in an oversized scrub suit and marched him into ICU.

He looked like a walking laundry basket. The head nurse recognized him as a child and bellowed, “Get that kid out of here now. No children are allowed.”

The mother rose up strong in Karen, and the usually mild-mannered lady glared steel-eyed right into the head nurse’s face, her lips a firm line. “He is not leaving until he sings to his sister” she stated. Then Karen towed Michael to his sister’s bedside. He gazed at the tiny infant losing the battle to live. After a moment, he began to sing.

In the pure-hearted voice of a 3-year-old, Michael sang:-

“You are my sunshine, my only sunshine, you make me happy when skies are grey.”

Instantly the baby girl seemed to respond. The pulse rate began to calm down and become steady.

“Keep on singing, Michael,” encouraged Karen with tears in her eyes.

“You never know, dear, how much I love you, please don’t take my sunshine away.” As Michael sang to his sister, the baby’s ragged, strained breathing became as smooth as a kitten’s purr.

“Keep on singing, sweetheart.”

“The other night, dear, as I lay sleeping, I dreamed I held you in my arms”. Michael’s little sister began to relax as rest, healing rest, seemed to sweep over her.

“Keep on singing, Michael.”

Tears had now conquered the face of the bossy head nurse. Karen glowed.

“You are my sunshine, my only sunshine. Please don’t take my sunshine away…” The next, day…the very next day…the little girl was well enough to go home.

Woman’s Day Magazine called it The Miracle of Brother’s Song. The medical staff just called it a miracle.

Karen called it a miracle of God’s love.

NEVER GIVE UP ON THE PEOPLE YOU LOVE. LOVE IS SO INCREDIBLY POWERFUL.

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With many peaceful blessings

Geoffrey

Giving When It Counts

Many  years ago, when I worked as a volunteer at a hospital, I got to  know a little girl named Liz who
was  suffering from a rare & serious disease.  Her  only chance of recovery appeared to be a  blood
transfusion from  her 5-year old brother, who had miraculously  survived the same disease and had
developed  the antibodies needed to combat the illness.

The doctor  explained the situation to her little brother, and asked the  little boy if he would be willing to give his blood to his  sister.

I saw him hesitate for only a  moment before taking a deep breath and saying, “Yes I’ll do it  if it will save
her.”

As the transfusion progressed, he  lay in bed next to his sister and smiled, as we all did,  seeing the colour returning to her cheek.  Then his face grew pale and his smile faded.

He looked  up at the doctor and asked with a trembling voice, “Will I  start to die right away”.

Being young,  the little boy had misunderstood the doctor; he thought he was  going to have to give his
sister all of his blood in order to  save her.

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Here’s my thought for the day.:-

Do we give when it really matters, or just when it is convenient to us?

Think on…………..

With many peaceful blessings

Geoffrey

 

The Methodist Church to bring Life and Healing this Easter

Kanja is a 30 year old woman living with HIV in Kenya. She lives in one room with her HIV-positive husband, a peasant farmer. They have two daughters, a four-year old (also HIV-positive) and a ten-month-old.

Following routine testing, Kanja was found to have cervical cancer and was scheduled for a hysterectomy. Despite including insurance covering most of her costs, Kanja still had to pay an additional £110 for the operation – a sum of money she and her husband could only dream of.

Thankfully, money donated in Britain covered the shortfall.

“We need to keep Kanja alive, as a person and child of God in her own right, but also as a mother who needs to care for her two young children – one with HIV and one who, we hope, will have a future without HIV through preventative treatment,” said Dr Claire Smithson, a mission partner working as an HIV/Aids doctor at the Maua Methodist hospital in Kenya. “We need mothers like Kanja to stay healthy, bring up their children and reduce the numbers of orphans in countries like Kenya.”

The 2015 Easter Offering dedication service draws inspiration from the prophetic vision of the Tree of Life that produces leaves for healing (Revelation 22:2). All of the funds raised in the service offerings will go towards the work of the Church’s World Mission Fund, to support work with people like Kanja all over the world.

The worship resources are free to download, or can be ordered direct from Methodist Publishing here (postage and packing charges will apply). The service includes Bible passages, music and prayers. There is a slot for an address, if required, although the service can be used without one. There are also stories from partner Churches that are engaged in healing, healthcare and reconciliation around the world.

The service has been written by a small task group of Methodist Women in Britain (MWiB), led by former MWiB President, Jill Baker. “It has been exciting to work on this year’s service,” said Jill. “We have three stories of remarkable work of healing and reconciliation going on around the world, enabled through the World Mission Fund, coupled with a mixture of old and new hymns and stirring bible passages.  It would be wonderful if every Methodist was able to share in this act of worship, which will also be shared through Twitter in the week after Easter.”

MWiB has also produced a series of reflections for each week in Lent, linked to the Easter Offering and each based on the image of a different tree. These can be found online here.

About the Methodist Church
The Methodist Church is one of the largest Christian churches serving Great Britain, with nearly 209,000 members and regular contact with 512,000 people. It has 5,023 churches in Great Britain, and also maintains links with other Methodist churches with a worldwide total membership of over 80 million. Its activities, both alone and with ecumenical and secular partners, are based on four aims known as Our Calling:
•   To increase awareness of God’s presence and to celebrate God’s love
•   To help people to grow and learn as Christians through mutual support and care
•   To be a good neighbour to people in need and to challenge injustice
•   To make more followers of Jesus Christ.

Registered charity no. 1132208.

For more information contact:

Toby Scott
Director of Communications
Methodist Church House
25 Marylebone Road, London NW1 5JR
T 0207 467 5221
E scottt@methodistchurch.org.uk

 

With many peaceful blessings

Geoffrey

Success comes to the man, who thinks he can!

Michael is the kind of guy you love to hate. He is always in a good mood and always has something positive to say.

When someone would ask him how he was doing, he would reply, “If I were any better, I would be twins!”

He was naturally motivated. If an employee was having a bad day, Michael was there telling the employee how to look on the positive side of the situation.

Seeing this style really made me curious, so one day I went up to Michael and asked him, “I don’t get it! You can’t be a positive person all of the time. How do you do it?”

Michael replied, “Each morning I wake up and say to myself, Mike, you have two choices today. You can choose to be in a good mood or you can choose to be in a bad mood. I choose to be in a good mood.

Each time something bad happens, I can choose to be a victim or I can choose to learn from it.

I choose to learn from it.

Every time someone comes to me complaining, I can choose to accept their complaining or I can point out the positive side of life. I choose the positive side of life.

“Yeah, right, it’s not that easy,” I protested.

“Yes, it is,” Michael said. “Life is all about choices. When you cut away all the junk, every situation is a choice. You choose how you react to situations. You choose how people will affect your mood.

You choose to be in a good mood or a bad mood. The bottom line: It’s your choice how you live life.”

I reflected on what Michael said.

Soon thereafter, I left the Tower Industry to start my own business. We lost touch, but I often thought about him when I made a choice about life instead of reacting to it.

Several years later, I heard that Michael was involved in a serious accident, falling some 60 feet from a communications tower. After 18 hours of surgery and weeks of intensive care, Michael was released from the hospital with rods placed in his back.

I saw Michael about six months after the accident. When I asked him how he was, he replied. “If I were any better, I’d be twins.

Wanna see my scars?” I declined to see his wounds, but did ask him what had gone through his mind as the accident took place.

“The first thing that went through my mind was the well-being of my soon to be born daughter,” Michael replied. “Then, as I lay on the ground, I remembered that I had two choices: I could choose to live or I could choose to die. I chose to live.”

“Weren’t you scared? Did you lose consciousness? “I asked.

Michael continued, “…the paramedics were great. They kept telling me I was going to be fine. But when they wheeled me into the ER and I saw the expressions on the faces of the doctors and nurses, I got really scared.

In their eyes, I read ‘he’s a dead man.’ I knew I needed to take action.” “What did you do?” I asked.
“Well, there was a big burly nurse shouting questions at me,” said Michael. “She asked if I was allergic to anything. ‘Yes, I replied. The doctors and nurses stopped working as they waited for my reply. I took a deep breath and yelled, “Gravity.”

Over their laughter, I told them, ‘I am choosing to live. Operate on me as if I am alive, not dead’. ”

Michael lived, thanks to the skill of his doctors, but also because of his amazing attitude.

Our positive attitude will always make such a BIG difference in our life.

If you think you are beaten, you most certainly will be. But great success comes to the man, who thinks he can!

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With many peaceful blessings

Geoffrey

Choices

Michael is the kind of guy you love to hate. He is always in a good mood and always has something positive to say.

When someone would ask him how he was doing, he would reply, “If I were any better, I would be twins!”

He was naturally motivated. If an employee was having a bad day, Michael was there telling the employee how to look on the positive side of the situation.

Seeing this style really made me curious, so one day I went up to Michael and asked him, “I don’t get it! You can’t be a positive person all of the time. How do you do it?”

Michael replied, “Each morning I wake up and say to myself, Mike, you have two choices today. You can choose to be in a good mood or you can choose to be in a bad mood. I choose to be in a good mood.

Each time something bad happens, I can choose to be a victim or I can choose to learn from it.

I choose to learn from it.

Every time someone comes to me complaining, I can choose to accept their complaining or I can point out the positive side of life. I choose the positive side of life.

“Yeah, right, it’s not that easy,” I protested.

“Yes, it is,” Michael said. “Life is all about choices. When you cut away all the junk, every situation is a choice. You choose how you react to situations. You choose how people will affect your mood.

You choose to be in a good mood or a bad mood. The bottom line: It’s your choice how you live life.”

I reflected on what Michael said.

Soon thereafter, I left the Tower Industry to start my own business. We lost touch, but I often thought about him when I made a choice about life instead of reacting to it.

Several years later, I heard that Michael was involved in a serious accident, falling some 60 feet from a communications tower. After 18 hours of surgery and weeks of intensive care, Michael was released from the hospital with rods placed in his back.

I saw Michael about six months after the accident. When I asked him how he was, he replied. “If I were any better, I’d be twins.

Wanna see my scars?” I declined to see his wounds, but did ask him what had gone through his mind as the accident took place.

“The first thing that went through my mind was the well-being of my soon to be born daughter,” Michael replied. “Then, as I lay on the ground, I remembered that I had two choices: I could choose to live or I could choose to die. I chose to live.”

“Weren’t you scared? Did you lose consciousness? “I asked.

Michael continued, “…the paramedics were great. They kept telling me I was going to be fine. But when they wheeled me into the ER and I saw the expressions on the faces of the doctors and nurses, I got really scared.

In their eyes, I read ‘he’s a dead man.’ I knew I needed to take action.”  “What did you do?” I asked.

“Well, there was a big burly nurse shouting questions at me,” said Michael. “She asked if I was allergic to anything. ‘Yes, I replied. The doctors and nurses stopped working as they waited for my reply. I took a deep breath and yelled, “Gravity.”

Over their laughter, I told them, ‘I am choosing to live. Operate on me as if I am alive, not dead’. ”

Michael lived, thanks to the skill of his doctors, but also because of his amazing attitude.

I learned from him that every day we have the choice to live fully. Attitude, after all, is everything.

From the Book of Heavenly Love